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Forza Motorsport 7 June Update

Staff
Monday, June 4, 2018

The June update for Forza Motorsport 7 will release on Tuesday, June 5! This month we have big list of features and improvements that are coming into the game, many of which have directly come from our ongoing conversation with the Forza community. We’ve added some major new features to the game, overhauled our #Forzathon system, and so much more. We’ll dive into all the new stuff that’s arrived with the June update in just a bit, but first, let’s focus on some awesome cars.

 

In June, we’re pointing the Forza spotlight on Ford and, with this update, we’re adding a brand-new Ford car to the Forza Motorsport 7 roster: the 1982 Ford #6 Zakspeed Roush Mustang IMSA GT. The Zakspeed Roush Mustang will available at no additional charge for all players, and we have lots of Ford-related fun for this car and others (see below for details).

 

Here’s a closer look at the Zakspeed Roush Mustang:

 

1982 Ford #6 Zakspeed Roush Mustang IMSA GT

The Zakspeed motor racing team is located near the historic Nürburgring. Since 1973 they have been collecting victories for Ford in their Group 2 Escort and Group 5 Capri cars. When Ford wanted to go racing with the Fox body Mustang, Zakspeed did the racing and Roush handled the performance. This wide-body, high-downforce design was created by Bob Riley and Roush built it out of carbon fiber, Nomex composite, and Kevlar. While Roush wanted to build a V8 to power the car, the trend at the time was toward smaller engines, and a 1.4-liter turbo that was later upgraded to 2.1 liters with an output of around 530 hp was used. Success was limited during the IMSA series at the time, but that doesn’t mean this beast won’t compete or, at the very least, scare the pants right off of you.

 

 

Next up, as we explained in the May episode of Inside Xbox, we’re making the Hoonigan Car Pack available for purchase for all Forza Motorsport 7 players. Previously available only to players who pre-ordered Forza Motorsport 7, the Hoonigan Car Pack will be available to everyone for purchase and, if you’re a FM7 Car Pass member, the Hoonigan Car Pack is included with the Forza Motorsport 7 Car Pass

 

June FM7 Update

The June update is a big one, touching on everything from our new interstitial (that’s the big window that pops up occasionally in Forza 7, letting players know about cool stuff happening in the game), to an overhaul of the Forza Motorsport 7 #Forzathon system, a new Data Out feature that will be a boon for Forza tinkerers, several new multiplayer features, and more. So much of this feedback has come from listening to what the Forza community wants and we’re just getting started.

 

In addition to the features we outline below, we’ve got our longer list of Release Notes on the Forza Forums, which includes fixes and other improvements not detailed here.

 

#Forzathon Updates

#Forzathon events are undergoing a change starting in June. Some of those changes are happening behind the scenes, others will be immediately apparent to the player. We’ve moved the #Forzathon system in Forza 7 to an internally managed service at Turn 10. This means that FM7 #Forzathon events are no longer tied to Xbox achievements. Instead, we will now manage #Forzathon events start to finish with our own systems. What this means for the players is new #Forzathon events coming into the game, with more variety, and more frequency. At the start we’ll have three events per week, each with its own reward. We’re varying the steps of events as well – each week we’ll have one 1-step, one 2-step, and one 3-step #Forzathon event to play. Naturally you’ll be able to monitor your progress as you make your way through each event. Look for those new #Forzathon events to go live this week.

 

Multiplayer Updates – Multi-Class, Tuning & More

With this update, we’ve put a big focus on multiplayer. Starting off, we’re happy to report that multi-class racing is returning to the game, giving players the chance to race against fields of multiple classes of cars. Multi-class isn’t new to Forza Motorsport 7 but it’s now better than ever, thanks to new features we’ve added to the game, like improved scoring. For the first time in Forza Motorsport multi-class player scoring will now be grouped by the player/class bucket. For example, if you’re racing in Class C vs. Class A lobby, all players will be scored according to the bucket/class they are in. If you’re grouped in the Class C cars, your scoring will keep track of how you’re doing in that class and the end-of-race podium will show off the top three finishers within that particular class/bucket.

 

We’ve also introduced per-bucket timing triggers in multi-class. For example, you could set the slowest class bucket to start the end-of-race timer, as opposed to the fastest class.

 

You’ll be able to try out the new spin on multi-class racing for a test drive when our new “ABCS” hopper makes its debut soon.

 

Multiplayer Tuning

In May, we introduced the ability for players to test drive their cars in multiplayer while waiting for a race lobby to finish. This month, we’re giving players the chance to tune their cars when in a multiplayer lobby or test driving their car. When test driving in a multiplayer lobby, you can now pause the game and choose the “Tune” option to make upgrades and adjustments to your car or download new tunes in real time. Once you apply the tune, that tune will be used in the race when you are pulled back into the lobby and set up for the next race. One other highly requested features arrives this month as well – you can now change your Assists in the middle of a multiplayer race. Simply pause the game, go to the Assists selection, and set the Assists as you’d like them before heading back into the race.

 

More Multiplayer Control

Multiplayer lobby hosts now have the option to password protect their lobbies. In addition, hosts have more control over the kinds of cars players use in a lobby, including forcing players to use rental cars. When hosts set up lobbies, they’ll see new options when setting up the race event, including:

 

Upgrades – Stock or Any

Tunes – Stock or Any

Ownership – Owned, Rental, or Any

 

 

Data Out

We’re opening up a new world for Forza Motorsport 7 players who want to expand their experience. What we colloquially refer to as a “Data Out” feature means that we now output a UDP data stream which players can take advantage of. This is the same data stream that powers the motion sleds we use at Turn 10 and now we’re putting that power in the hands of players. The possibilities here are limited only by the imagination of the developer – from motion sleds to dashboards, data logging, etc. All of the data is sent to a remote machine at 60fps but localhost streaming is not supported.

 

The initial data structure is designed to support motion sleds. For a look at the current output structure available to players, check out this post on the Forza forums.

 

Photography – New Panning Focus Mode

Forzatographers, we’ve got something cool for you in June as well. With this update, players can now toggle between Tracking and Panning camera options in Photo Mode. This option appears when players go into Photo Mode and then into “Effects Mode” (Y button on Xbox One controller). Players will see a new option to toggle between “Tracking” Camera and “Panning” Camera in the Effects menu.

 

So what do these two options mean? The “Tracking” camera is the same legacy camera option that has always been in Forza’s Photo Mode. Here, the Tracking Camera acts as if it was attached to a car moving at the same speed and direction as the focus car. The new “Panning” camera option acts as if the photo is being shot from a standstill (more akin to how a real trackside photographer would work at a real race event).

 

The differences between the two camera options is best seen when taking action shots. The new “Panning” Camera option offers a deeper motion blur effect than the “Tracking” camera, and is most noticeable on objects in the far background. In addition, focusing when using the “Panning” camera puts the focus on a specific part of the car, giving players easier options to focus on the hood of a car, for example, while the rear section of the car is more blurred. In all, the option to switch between focus camera options gives players more power to create the types of shots they want on the track.

 

A shot using the traditional Tracking focus option.

 

A shot using the new Panning focus option, available as part of the June update for Forza Motorsport 7.

 

Ford Spotlight Events

As mentioned above, we’re spotlighting Ford this month in Forza Motorsport 7. It starts with the free 1982 Ford #6 Zakspeed Roush Mustang IMSA GT going out to all players with the June update, but it doesn’t end there. Here’s a look at what’s happening in the game for fans of the Blue Oval this month:

 

Rivals

Take your shiny new Zakspeed Roush Mustang and put it to the test in our Ford Spotlight monthly Rivals event. At the end of the month, everyone who sets a time in the event will win a new exclusive car – the 1981 Ford Fiesta XR2 Forza Edition! Elsewhere, with the Hoonigan Car Pack now available to all players, we’re lighting up a new Rivals event starring perhaps the most famous Hoonigan car of all: the Ford Hoonicorn Mustang.

 

Leagues

If you can’t wait to get your hands on the Ford Fiesta XR2 Forza Edition that will be the reward for our Spotlight Rivals event in June, you’ll be able to get your hands on it during a special League event in June. You’ll be able to drive the car in the event before it is sent out as the reward for the Ford Spotlight Rivals event.

 

#Forzathon

With the updates to our #Forzathon system, we’ve got some fun Ford-centric events coming in the game in June, including events starring the 1978 Ford Mustang II King Cobra and more.

 

In addition to all the Ford fun, we have lots of additional events arriving across Rivals, Leagues, and #Forzathon events in June and beyond. Stay tuned to www.forzamotorsport.net for all the latest.

 

Hoonigan Car Pack

We heard loud and clear that players who missed out on the Hoonigan Car Pack have wanted that car pack to return and, as of this update, we’re making it happen. The cars of the Hoonigan Car Pack are now available for purchase. If you’re a Forza Motorsport 7 Car Pass owner, there’s even better news: the Hoonigan cars are available to Car Pass owners at no additional charge. If it’s been a while since you’ve explored the Hoonicorn and the rest, here’s a refresher of all the cars that are included with the pack. (Images are from Forza Horizon 3)

 

1965 Hoonigan Ford "Hoonicorn" Mustang

You may have thought the 845-horsepower AWD Hoonicorn from Gymkhana 7 would be impossible to top, but this is Ken Block and Hoonigan we are talking about. In the realm of Hoonigan, there are no limits, so when Block got an idea for a new tire-destroying video concept, he decided he needed more power. To get there Vaughn Gitten Jr.’s RTR tuning shop employed two monster turbos, one red, one blue to go with the new patriotic livery, and started feeding the 6.7-liter V8 methanol. With a conservatively rated 1,400 horsepower, perhaps the Hoonicorn will breathe enough fire to quell the horsepower hungry Hoonigan? For now, at least, the upgrades seem to have earned praise and respect from Block, who called it, “the absolute most frightening thing I’ve ever driven.”

 

 

1992 Hoonigan Mazda RX-7 Twerkstallion

The Twerkstallion is powered by a Chevrolet LS V8, although Hert (he of the Hoonigan Garage) later swapped it back to a turbo-charged rotary, and so can you in Forza. What the LS power means is massive torque from idle to screaming redline, which will come in handy as you put the power down and get sideways in a car that was quite literally built to drift. The Mazda RX-7 FC has always been a go-to drift car and it’s no wonder, given its incredible weight distribution and light weight. Kitted up from the ground up with bulging lines, massive wheels, and the gorgeous lines from its original form, you will be hard pressed to find a better car to drift, hoon, or simply burn tires than the Twerkstallion.

 

 

1991 Hoonigan Rauh-Welt Begriff Porsche 911 Turbo

How do you get the respect of those who consider everything Porsche sacred and those who love the most extreme looks on the road? Possibly the only person who knows is Akira Nakai of RWB. For years, Nakai-san has been creating unique “rough-world concepts” that the average car-lover sees as extreme wide-body street designs. When Hoonigan’s Brian Scotto wanted to build his dream Porsche, he went to Naikai and this was the result. The turbo-charged flat six has been left mostly alone but the suspension has been highly-modded to not only accept the massive set of custom Fifteen52 wheels but also to provide a smooth ride without sacrificing grip. The car debuted at SEMA in Las Vegas after being driven 850 miles shortly after being finished; proof that the job was done right.

 

 

1978 Hoonigan Ford Escort RS1800

What started as one of the most beloved cars ever built by Ford, became – true to its rally roots – a tarmac focused stage rally car for Ken Block. That destiny was taken to yet another degree over the course of two years while Hoonigan transformed it yet again. Visually the TRA Kyoto Rocket Bunny kit sets the tone for the Gymkhana-destined Escort. Under the hood is the ultimate Escort engine, a Millington Diamond Series II. The alloy block and head weigh less than 200 pounds and make a naturally aspirated 333 horsepower on its way to a sky-high 9,000 rpm redline. Sure, there is tons of grip available, but the rear end can be kicked out with a simple squirt of the gas pedal or tug on the handbrake. From the inside out, this is a quality over quantity build that is so exquisite you might call it art. That is, if you could see it through the smoke pouring from the wheel wells.

 

 

1972 Hoonigan Chevrolet "Napalm Nova"

Sometimes, rough around the edges is better than smoothed over perfection, as is the case of the “Napalm Nova” of Hoonigan’s Brian Scotto. Start in the belly of the beast with an AME GT Sport sub-frame that alters the steering geometry to make this Nova just as comfortable on the twisty bits as the drag strip. As the deck lid states, this big block Chevy powered beast’s intents are to “Kill All Tires.” Don’t come around looking for glitter and glam in this build though; it’s all about function first, letting the car’s well-loved heritage shine through in all the right places.

 

 

1955 Hoonigan Chevrolet Bel Air

The Gasser era began in the 1950s, as hot-rodders searched for speed. Simply put, a Gasser uses gasoline instead of racing fuels like alcohol or nitromethane and their look is deliberate and purposeful. Removing weight via parts removal or replacement with lighter parts is standard fare, along with the jacked-up front end that contributes to weight transfer, allowing the car to hook up at the line and go. Jon Chase of the Hoonigan Garage found this well-loved basket case Bel Air and immediately went about making it a roller. “Tri-Five By Fire” is what Chase named his ever-evolving creation. In the automotive world Tri-Five refers to the 1955-56 or 57 Chevy Bel Airs, while the By Fire portion of the title speaks to the challenges of jumping into a project with both feet and making it happen.

 

 

2003 Hoonigan Holden Commodore Ute

You may have watched the Hoonigans Daily Transmission shows on YouTube. Here the boys of the Donut Garage in Long Beach build amazing cars and generally destroy tires. This Commodore Ute was built in the Donut Garage to do just that: “Kill All Tires!” With a supercharged Chevy LS motor under the hood to do the walking and all the glamor of that wide body kit to the talking, you won’t find a better way get your Aussie on. Yes, the steering wheel is on the “wrong” side, but that just takes you one step closer to the beast’s Down Under roots.