May TopGear Car Pack

John Schommer
Tuesday, April 24, 2012

 

The May TopGear Car Pack is on its way! On Tuesday, May 1, ten new cars to race, collect, and appreciate will be available. The pack includes iconic classics from the 1960s and 70s, unique one-off creations, a little 4WD JDM love and some sweet late model production cars. From radical design canvasses to rigs with freakish drift potential, the saying, “something for everyone” is fitting this month. With the May TopGear Car Pack, you can go anywhere, at any speed, and enjoy whatever level of style you see fit. 

 

 

Here’s the list of cars available in the May TopGear Car Pack:

 

2012 Hennessey Venom GT 

Born with the goal of being a 1,000-plus horsepower car that weighs less than 3,000-pounds, the Hennessey Venom GT is based on the Lotus Elise—complete with the Venom 1,000 horsepower, twin-turbo motor, then lightened. Certainly these are reasonable goals, so long as destroying a Bugatti Veyron’s 0-200 mph time is your primary focus. As a result, the Hennessey Venom GT does 0-200 mph faster than many average cars car do 0-60 mph: 15.3 seconds to be exact. That’s almost 10 seconds faster than the Bugatti. The G-forces felt under full acceleration nearly equal that of a fighter jet doing an inverted loop. The all-aluminum 6.2-liter, twin-turbo, V8 delivers an astonishing 1,200 horsepower, put to the pavement via a six-speed transmission connected to the rear wheels. The car is almost entirely carbon fiber composite and weighs in at a mere 2,685 pounds. The Venom GT has the highest power-to-weight ratio of any car on the market and only five will be built this year.

 

2012 Hennessey Venom GT

 

1977 AMC Pacer X 

Wayne and Garth never had it so good. The coveted Pacer X model had style and performance even the Mirthmobile couldn’t match. The X model came with a front-sway bar, sport-steering column, vinyl bucket seats, and additional chrome to go with the Pacer X decals. Yes, the decals did actually make it faster. Performance like this can only be improved by blasting “Bohemian Rhapsody” while in the driver’s seat. The “Flying Fishbowl” runs on a 232-cubic-inch 3.8-liter, inline six and had an available two-barrel carburetor. You could also opt for the punchier 258 I6, but both delivered only 100 horsepower in a 3,000-pound car. Though of modest performance, the Pacer X was a pinnacle of 70’s styling and deserves an honored place in any collection. 

 

1977 AMC Pacer X

 

2011 Ford Transit SuperSportVan 

The SuperSportVan is the latest creation in a long-standing series of Ford-built custom transit vans dating back to 1971. The first, the Transit Supervan, was based on the Ford GT40 and could reach 150 mph. A later version, the 1984 Supervan II, was built with a Cosworth racing engine and hit a speed of 178 mph at Silverstone. The 2011 Ford Transit SuperSportvan is a bit tamer and dons Le Mans bonnet stripes and an eye-catching livery on the outside. Inside is the 3.2-liter, 198-horsepower Duratorq TDCi engine taken from the much larger Transit Jumbo. What’s the point? It’s a one-off design to show that Ford engineers can have fun too, and it was unveiled at the 2011 Commercial Vehicle Show in Birmingham, UK. It also presents a vast canvas for designs and further customization for Forza 4 fans. 

 

2011 Ford Transit SuperSportVan

 

2012 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon 

For 2012 the Wrangler received a new engine, the Pentastar V6. It delivers significantly more horsepower, a total of 280 ponies and more torque, 260 pound-feet to be exact. That’s a 40 percent increase in power, and a 10 percent increase in torque. More juice is good! And it even gets better mileage. The 2012 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon is by far the most comfortable and amenity-loaded Wrangler ever. Inside the cabin you will find redundant steering wheel controls, a refined dash and center console, as well as things like heated seats and mirrors. Jeep has not forgotten why most people buy Wranglers either, so its capability off-road has been enhanced too. In the Rubicon model you will find sturdy Dana 44 axles front and rear, a locking rear differential, and stock water-fording capability of 30 inches. The Jeep’s wide stance and short wheelbase also make it a blast to drive on pavement. While it’s truly at home on the trail, you will find its track performance more than just capable.

 

2012 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon

 

1966 Lotus Cortina 

One of the first “race on Sunday, commute on Monday” factory cars, the Lotus Cortina built its reputation on the track and in people’s daily lives. Henry Ford II assigned Lotus’ Colin Chapman the task of building a Ford that was performance inspired and could give Ford some racing credibility. The Cortina did so in triplicate, winning rally and touring car championships right and left and being driven by the likes of Jim Clark. The Cortina provides a peppy 0-60 time of just under 10 seconds and adroit cornering. Partially in part to its dainty 2,060 pounds of weight, and, without doubt, credit needs to be given to its 115 horsepower which are generated by a twin-cam 1.6-liter 4-cylinder, with thirsty and throaty sounding dual-Weber carbs. While this car can carry four people in relative comfort, it is most happy when being revved high and thrown into a corner with full gusto.

 

1966 Lotus Cortina

 

1992 Mitsubishi Galant VR-4 

A turbo-charged, four-cylinder, four-wheel drive, four-wheel steering, four-door sedan, sold in limited numbers makes the Mitsubishi Galant VR-4 a treasured piece of JDM history. It also makes for a barrel of fun to drive. While providing comfort and sophistication for its passengers, the VR-4 ignites off the line, cuts into corners, and brakes with precision. The engine develops a potent 237 horsepower put to the wheels via a center differential that detects wheel slippage and re-directs power to the axle with the most traction. Four-wheel steering engages at speeds more than 31 mph and turns the rear wheels up to 1.5 degrees to enable optimum turn angle and cornering stability. Throughout the VR-4 you will find technology that caters to a driving experience matched only by much more expensive sedans.

 

1992 Mitsubishi Galant VR-4

 

2012 Smart ForTwo 

The uncontested champion of the “Easy to Park” award, the Smart ForTwo is the first micro car to be introduced to the U.S. Just 106 inches long, it is by far the smallest production car made. Made for two full-size adults and couple bags of groceries (at the most), it was not designed for the family or for performance. It is a practical urban errand runner where efficiency is the goal. The ForTwo’s looks will usually spark a conversation and its popularity has been surprising. The 3-cylinder engine is located in the rear of the car and pumps out a mild 70 horsepower coupled to an automated manual transmission pushing the rear wheels. If you think the Nürburgring is narrow, try the Smart ForTwo; the world becomes immensely bigger when driving one.

 

2012 Smart ForTwo

 

1990 Subaru Legacy RS 

Subaru brought new game to 1990 dealer showrooms, putting aside their smaller, quirkier wagons and sedans for the new Legacy line. These cars were much more substantial in size, quality, and amenities. The Legacy RS Turbo was the most powerful model and has a strong following among Subie enthusiasts. It’s off road racing record is considerable and proved its endurance and ability to perform, and this was prior to Subaru’s dominance of the WRC. The highly desirable EJ20G engine later used in the WRX made more than 200 horsepower and provided a new level of performance. Subaru all-wheel drive keeps the Legacy RS steady and capable under any conditions on any track. 

 

1990 Subaru Legacy RS

 

2012 Chrysler 300 SRT8 

Getting right to it, the Chrysler 300 SRT8 has a huge Hemi under the hood. More than 450 horsepower horsepower and 465 pound-feet of torque connected to the rear wheels makes for a tire-smoking good time. It also makes for some pretty amazing performance; like 0-60 mph in less than five seconds and under thirteen second quarter mile times. Performance like this used to be born of modifications and aftermarket parts. Now Chrysler is giving it to you right out of the box. Even fuel economy is boosted. Do you remember the days when more horsepower meant lower mileage? Those days are past, now comfort and sophistication meet monster muscle and performance in the 300 SRT8, not surprisingly Chrysler has made them go delightfully hand in hand.

 

2012 Chrysler 300 SRT8

 

1965 Austin-Healey 3000 MkIII  

The beauty that is embodied by the Austin-Healy 3000 MkIII is equaled only by similarly hand-crafted boats and motorcycles of the era constructed by skilled craftsmen who put their heart and soul into everything they built. Curvaceous and sparkling wood, leather, and steel combine in a car that has a large collector following, not just due to its form but also its performance. Under the shapely hood is a 147-hp, 2,912-cc, six-cylinder overhead-valve engine with dual SU downdraft carburetors. The gruff, low-toned rasp created by the exhaust unmistakably denotes its period and homeland. Strangely, this Austin-Healey was built by neither Austin nor Healey, but by Jensen. The “big” Healey--or “Squealy” as it was often called--delivers an exhilarating open-air ride and grippy cornering.  Throwing this car sideways with the tires squealing will make you want to don a driving cap with goggles and wail, ”Tallyho fine fellows!” in your best English accent.

 

Coinciding with the release of the May TopGear Car Pack, we’ll also be launching a new batch of Community Monthly Rivals Mode events, including an event starring the awesomely powerful 2012 Hennessey Venom GT. We’ll be awarding unicorn cars to 100 random players per week who set a leaderboard time in this Hennessey Venom GT event.

 

The May TopGear Car Pack is not included as part of the Forza Motorsport 4 Season Pass, which concluded with the April Alpinestars Car Pack. Season Pass owners will need to purchase the May TopGear Car Pack separately. The May TopGear Car Pack will be available on May 1 for 560 MS Points ($7 USD).